RUB » Faculty of Computer Science » DNet | Distributed and Networked Systems 

Overview



[Summer 2021] Distributed Systems

The lecture “Distributed Systems” covers basic architectures and methods that allow for functional and productive distributed computer systems. Such a distributed system employs multiple independent subsystems to fulfill a certain task. It will, however, appear to the user a coherent single system. To achieve this goal, the different subsystems need to have common knowledge. Distributed across independent subsystems causes multiple challenges that will be addresses in this lecture: subsystems need to be discoverable, they need to exchange messages, replicated data needs to be kept in a consistent state across the subsystems, faults in single subsystems need to be tolerated, and resources of the entire distributed system should be used efficiently such that the given task is fulfilled effectively and efficiently. These components and aspects can be found in modern, Internet-based systems. They guarantee functionality of services like the World Wide Web, email or file sharing.

Organization

Language of Instruction: English

Teaching will be remote in this semester and lectures will be provided by video.
The following class hours are used for some a live recap and Q&A sessions.

Live recap:           Thursdays, 10:15am to 11:45am, Zoom (see Moodle for link).
Exercise hours:   Thursdays, 2:15pm to 3:45pm, Zoom (see Moodle for link).
Lecture Period at RUB:     April 12 to July 23, 2021.
  There will be no classes on
  • May 13 (Ascension)
  • May 28 (Pentecost vacation at RUB)
  • June 03 (Corpus Christi)
We might have to compensate for these vacation days by extra lecture videos. TBA.

1st Exam: Written, on campus, on 2021 September 03.
2nd Exam: Written, on campus, in the lecture free period after Winter 2021/22.

Course credits: 5 CP

Contact: Only by email to the address provided in our Moodle course.
Moodle course: Distributed Systems (150347-Sose2021)

Literature:

  • Andrew S. Tanenbaum and Maarten van Steen, Distributed Systems – Principles and Paradigms, Pearson.

[Summer 2021] Deterministic Network Calculus

Content Description

Distributed systems are omnipresent nowadays and networking them is fundamental for the continuous dissemination and thus availability of data. Provision of data in real- time is one of the most important non-functional aspects that safety-critical networks must guarantee. Formal verification of data communication against worst-case deadline requirements is key to certification of emerging x-by-wire systems. Verification allows aircraft to take off, cars to steer by wire, and safety-critical industrial facilities to oper- ate. Therefore, different methodologies for worst-case modeling and analysis of real-time systems have been established. Among them is deterministic Network Calculus (NC), a versatile technique that is applicable across multiple domains such as packet switching, task scheduling, system on chip, software-defined networking, data center networking and network virtualization. NC is a methodology to derive deterministic bounds on two crucial performance metrics of communication systems:
   (a) the end-to-end delay data flows experience and
   (b) the buffer space required by a server to queue all incoming data.

(Text source: [bib])

Organization

Language of Instruction: English

Class hours (2 SWS):
        • the lecture will mainly take place en bloc in the lecture-free period
        • on demand during lecture period: Fridays, 10:15am to 11:45am, online.
Exercise hours (2 SWS):
        • the exercise will mainly take place en bloc in the lecture-free period
        • on demand during lecture period: Fridays, 12:15pm to 1:45pm, online.
Exam: Oral, on campus, by individual appointment..

Course credits: 5 CP

Contact: Only by email to the address provided in our Moodle course.
Moodle course: Deterministic Network Calculus (150314-SoSe2021)

Literature:

  • Jean-Yves Le Boudec and Patrick Thiran. Network Calculus. Springer, 2001. (PDF @author)
  • Cheng-Shang Chang, Performance Guarantees in Communication Networks. Springer, 2000.
  • Jörg Liebeherr. Duality of the Max-Plus and Min-Plus Network Calculus. Foundation and Trends in Networking, 2017. (PDF @author)

[Winter 2020/21] Distributed and Networked Systems (Seminar)

A distributed system consists of a set of independent subsystems that fulfill a specific task in a coordinated fashion. The subsystems rely on a communication network to exchange messages. Besides the basic networking functionality, non-functional aspects such as robustness, dependability and performance need to be provided. This seminar will cover such topics in a conference-style setup.

Organization

Open to B.Sc. and M.Sc. students (incl. Applied Computer Science).
There is a limit of 8 participants.
You need to grab a paper on Dec 22, first come first served. See kickoff slides in Moodle.

Language of Instruction: English, German only if absolutely necessary
Contact: Alexander Scheffler, M.Sc.

Moodle course


[Winter 2020/21] Technische Informatik 1: Rechnerarchitektur

Veranstaltung für den Studiengang B.Sc. Informatik, 1. Semester

Ziele

Die Studierenden kennen Zusammenhänge und haben Detailkenntnisse bezüglich der Komponenten und der Funktionsweise moderner Computersysteme. Dies schließt neben dem Prozessor auch das Speichersystem und die Schnittstellen zu weiteren Systemkomponenten ein. Auf der Basis dieser Kenntnisse sind die Studierenden in der Lage Computersysteme und deren Komponenten bezüglich verschiedener Metriken, wie z.B. Energieverbrauch, Rechenleistung, Speicherperformance etc. auf deren Eignung für eine bestimmte Aufgabe zu bewerten. Weiterhin haben die Teilnehmer dieser Veranstaltung die grundsätzliche Arbeitsweise und den prinzipiellen Aufbau von Prozessoren auf der Ebene der Mikroarchitektur verstanden und sind in der Lage, den Einfluss von Architekturmerkmalen, wie z.B. Pipelining oder Out-of-Order-Execution, auf die Befehlsausführung zu analysieren. (Quelle)

Inhalt

Die Veranstaltung Rechnerarchitektur befasst sich mit dem Aufbau und der Funktion moderner Prozessoren und Computersysteme. Ausgehend von grundlegenden Computerstrukturen wie der Von-Neumann- und der Harvard-Architektur werden der Aufbau, die Klassifizierung und die technische Realisierung von Rechnersystemen dargestellt. Hierbei wird die Programmierung auf Assemblerebene sowie die Verarbeitung von Programmen durch einen Prozessor erläutert. Darauf aufbauend folgen Methoden zu Leistungsbewertung von Prozessoren auf der Basis von standardisierten Benchmarks und verschiedene Metriken, um die Ergebnisse einordnen zu können. Der inhaltliche Schwerpunkt der Vorlesung stellt die tiefgehende Analyse der Mikroarchitekturebene eines Prozessors dar, wobei sowohl der Datenpfad als auch das Steuerwerk im Rahmen der Vorlesung schrittweise entwickelt und erläutert werden. Auf der Basis des in der Vorlesung vorgestellten Prozessors werden dann moderne Verfahren zur Leistungssteigerung und deren Einsatzgebiete vorgestellt. Neben dem eigentlichen Prozessor wird auch das Speichersystem moderner Computer und verschiedene Schnittstellen zu internen und externen Komponenten des Computersystems behandelt. Alle Themen werden mit aktuellen Beispielen aus verschiedenen Bereichen der Technik erläutert, so dass neben dem im Detail vorgestellten Beispielprozessor mit MIPS Architektur auch moderne Hochleistungsprozessoren mit x86-64 ISA, Prozessoren für eingebettete Systeme auf Basis der ARM-Architektur, extrem energiesparende Prozessoren auf Basis des MSP430, wie sie zum Beispiel in IoT-Geräten zum Einsatz kommen, und anwendungsspezifische Spezialprozessoren auf Basis der Tensilica Xtensa Plattform vorgestellt werden. (Quelle)

Organisation

Moodle Kurs

Dozent:
Sprache: Deutsch

Ansprechpartner in der Fakultät für Mathematik:
Vorlesung (2 SWS): Online als Video, zusätzlich wöchentliche Fragestunde.
Übung (2 SWS): Gruppen werden zentral vom CCS koordiniert, Termine folgen.
Vorlesungszeit: 2. November 2020 bis 12. Februar 2021.
  • Weihnachtsferien: 23. Dezember 2020 bis 6. Januar 2021
Prüfung: schriftlich, Termin folgt.
ECTS: 5 CP

[Summer 2020] Worst-Case Analysis of Distributed Systems

superseded by the lecture Deterministic Network Calculus

Content Description

TL;DR This lecture will be about deterministic network calculus.

Distributed systems are omnipresent nowadays and networking them is fundamental for the continuous dissemination and thus availability of data. Provision of data in real- time is one of the most important non-functional aspects that safety-critical networks must guarantee. Formal verification of data communication against worst-case deadline requirements is key to certification of emerging x-by-wire systems. Verification allows aircraft to take off, cars to steer by wire, and safety-critical industrial facilities to oper- ate. Therefore, different methodologies for worst-case modeling and analysis of real-time systems have been established. Among them is deterministic Network Calculus (NC), a versatile technique that is applicable across multiple domains such as packet switching, task scheduling, system on chip, software-defined networking, data center networking and network virtualization. NC is a methodology to derive deterministic bounds on two crucial performance metrics of communication systems:
   (a) the end-to-end delay data flows experience and
   (b) the buffer space required by a server to queue all incoming data.

(Text source: [bib])

Organization

Self-enrollment to this course has been disabled, please contact Steffen Bondorf in case of questions.

Language of Instruction: English

Class hours (2 SWS):        Fridays, 10:15am to 11:45am in IA 1/181.
Exercise hours (2 SWS):   Fridays, 8:30am to 10:00am in IA 1/181.
Lecture Period at RUB:     April 20 to July 17, 2020.
  • Note the Labor Day holiday in Germany: there will be no classes on May 01.
  • The exercise classes will start on May 08.
  • Note the Pentecost vacation at RUB: there will be no classes on June 05.
Exam: Either written or oral, TBD.

Course credits: 5 CP

Moodle course: Worst-Case Analysis of Distributed Systems (150314-SoSe20)
The WoCADS Moodle course's password can be found in the Moodle course "Mathematikstudium-Info" that was created for students of Mathematics at RUB. In case you are not subscribed to that course, please contact the Mathematics studies counseling service (studienberatung-mathe@rub.de).

More details will be sent to the participants registered in this course.

Literature:

  • Jean-Yves Le Boudec and Patrick Thiran. Network Calculus. Springer, 2001. (PDF @author)
  • Cheng-Shang Chang, Performance Guarantees in Communication Networks. Springer, 2000.
  • Jörg Liebeherr. Duality of the Max-Plus and Min-Plus Network Calculus. Foundation and Trends in Networking, 2017. (PDF @author)

[Winter 2019/20] Verteilte und Vernetzte Systeme (Seminar)

Ein verteiltes System besteht aus einer Menge unabhängiger Teilsysteme, die gemeinsam eine bestimmte Aufgabe erfüllen. Hierzu kommunizieren die Teilsysteme durch den Austausch von Nachrichten. Somit ergeben sich neben funktionalen auch nicht-funktionale Anforderungen an die zugrundeliegende Vernetzung der Teilsysteme. Insbesondere Robustheit, Zuverlässigkeit und Leistungsfähigkeit müssen oftmals formal nachgewiesen werden und stehen im Vordergrund dieses Seminars.

Organisation

Veranstaltungssprache: Englisch Deutsch

Das Seminar wird in der zweiten Semesterhälfte angeboten.
Bitte Ankündigungen etc. im Moodle-Kurs beachten.